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Wednesday, 10 July 2013

Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Posted by Jake 13 comments Labels: , , , , ,
Posted by Jake on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 with 13 comments | Labels: , , , , ,

UPDATED FEB 2016: In July 2015 MPs got a salary hike from £67,000 to £74,000, and backdated the rise to the previous May. The watchdog also ruled that future pay increases would be adjusted every year in line with average earnings within the public sector, rather than being linked to the whole economy as previously announced. They then immediately broke that promise again, with a 1.3% pay rise (the public sector was capped at 1%) in April 2016.


It's astonishing how many rational people believe that an MPs salary is too low to attract good people. We are grateful to @simplem_ths for this simple graph that gives you the facts at a glance. Next time you hear this 'underpaid' nonsense use this to rebut it:



Those who claim MPs work so very hard they need extra money to console themselves need look no further than the Members' Register of Interests. Here they will see the many MPs who find they have enough spare time to hold second jobs earning them thousands of pounds. Names of MPs in brackets shown in the list below are given as examples. This is just a sample from MPs with surnames starting with an A or a B - there are many many more than just these - taken from data gathered by The Guardian.
- Broadcasting (Diane Abbot (L))
- Adviser/Consultant (David Amess (C); Kevin Barron (C); Nick Boles (C))
- Barrister/Solicitor (Steven Baker (C); Jake Berry (C))
- Newspaper Columnist (John Baron (C); David Blunkett (L))
- Dentist (Sir Paul Beresford (C))
- Local Councillor (Gordon Birtwhistle (LD))
- Crown Court Recorder (Robert Buckland (C))

Whatever the reason for our MPs being the sorry lot they are, it isn't insufficient pay.

Data Sources:
Teacher: http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching/salary/teaching-salary-scales.aspx?sc_lang=en-GB
Nurse: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/working-in-the-nhs/pay-and-benefits/agenda-for-change-pay-rates/
Doctor: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore-by-career/doctors/pay-for-doctors/
Soldier: http://www.army.mod.uk/join/20097.aspx

13 comments:

  1. It is very easy to bang the sensationalist drum that politicians should earn less, but MPs have a drive and work hours that would put 99% of Britons to shame. They have pressures and responsibilities on them that public sector workers, who can take a 'sickie' whenever they feel like slumping infront of the tele because they have a flu, have no idea about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Public Sector worker can get fired for 8 days sick.

      Fact.

      Get yourself a fucking clue before you roll out the same bullshit that the Tories have been feeding you in a bread roll with one hand and a hand up your arse with another.

      Know what a puppet is?

      It's you.

      Cock.

      Delete
    2. You mean the "pressure and responsibilities" that give them plenty of time to do second jobs?

      Delete
    3. They do very little they employ people to do most of the work as for holidays they get more than anyone I know of? as for time spent in London they only sit in parliament for around 140 days per year? HELLO? They get a pension for life even if they only serve one term as a MP, subsidised meals and drink as for expenses don't get me going on that subject

      As for running the country look at the sate we are in I doubt the buggers could run a bath correctly let alone the country, the whole lot of them should be lined up against a wall and shot for treason.

      Delete
  2. BBC reports: "MPs' pay: Watchdog to back pay rise of more than £6,000"
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-23262503

    ReplyDelete
  3. "A Public Sector worker can get fired for 8 days sick.

    Fact."

    hang on.. is it fact?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/departmental-absence-management-policies.pdf

      3.12. Formal action begins when an employee’s absence reaches an
      unsatisfactory level; in other words it reaches or exceeds the consideration point.
      The consideration point is usually 8 working. 8 days is comparable to the level
      set by other organisations and takes account of special circumstances in the
      Department i.e., workforce profile (the Department employs disproportionately
      large numbers of employees in groups – women and administrative graded staff –
      that across both the public and private sector record higher levels of absence).

      3.21. Whilst the vast majority of cases end in a successful return to work or an
      agreed severance (i.e. ill health retirement) there are limits to the amount of
      sickness absence the Department can support. Dismissal is considered where
      employees are unlikely to return to satisfactory attendance within a reasonable
      period of time, despite been given help and encouragement.

      It *is* a fact. It's unlikely, but this is no different to the Private Sector and it's unfair to presume that Public Sector Workers have it any easier in this regard.

      I'd also be interested to know why the first comment felt the need to mention Public Sector workers at all? Where's the context?

      Riots in Brazil? Blame the UK Public Sector! England fail to win the World Cup? Bloody Public Sector!

      If you want to talk about context, when did an MP get fired for excessive sickness? I'm not suggesting that it hasn't happened but I've not heard of it.

      Delete
    2. Well said. And don't forget MP's have employees to 'help' them fulfil their duties. How many employees have 'employees' to assist them to do an extremely well paid job?

      Delete
  4. I wonder how much the MPs would think I am worth , for the last 12 years I like many others work an average 140 hours per week. The work I do is both mental and physical, does not allow, for socialising, watching tv, having days off or holidays.
    I would like to see any MP do the job that I and others do . Then would like them to tell me why they deserve a pay rise plus benefits, when many of us do not get a penny and those that do get less than £54 per week.
    Oh and just so you know I am dictating tnis to my niece, as I havent time !

    ReplyDelete
  5. Most have more in the bank than most of us anyway so this to them is a pittance hence the expenses and other jobs they do? if you check most are not even in the house that much anyway, and then once a week where they are supposed to represent? lets face it they do it for the money not that they need it? most have never had a real job would not know how to do a real job? time for change

    ReplyDelete
  6. Pressures and responsibilities are working 12 hour night shifts 5 nights a week on minimum wage looking after patients with dementia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did that for years, some times doing 14 nights on the trot without a proper break, now I'm old, tired, knackered and penniless. I can't get my head round the saying all in it together. Quality of life has diminished greatly for countless thousands of us Brits, it doesn't make any sense to me. At least my vote still counts and it won't be going to a Nasty Tory.

      Delete
  7. Pay them the average wage+10% just to keep them close to the poor sods who voted for them.

    ReplyDelete

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